Atlanta Hosts "A Day with HIV" Art Exhibit

by Winnie McCroy
EDGE Editor
Monday Dec 9, 2013
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Amy Levy of Atlanta with her adoptive family, some members of which are HIV-positive
Amy Levy of Atlanta with her adoptive family, some members of which are HIV-positive  (Source:Amy Levy )

The Atlanta-Fulton Public Library System’s Central Library location in downtown Atlanta invites all to the exhibition "A Day With HIV," to raise awareness and educate local communities about HIV, testing and prevention, and to contribute to changing perceptions surrounding HIV.

"We must re-double our efforts to assure that all people know about HIV, how to prevent transmission, their HIV status, and that people with HIV are linked to care, and treatment and prevention services. We can stop HIV Together -- by getting the facts, getting tested and getting involved," writes the CDC on their website.

"A Day with HIV" features a select collection of photos submitted by real people across the world, whether HIV-positive or negative, who captured and shared a moment of their day to focus attention on the daily trials and triumphs of people living with HIV and those who care for them. This traveling community photo exhibit is designed to raise awareness and educate local communities about HIV, testing and prevention, and to contribute to changing perceptions surrounding HIV.


Olympic medalist Ji Wallace with boyfriend Shaun Baldwin outside their home by the beach in Sydney, Australia  (Source:Ji Wallace)

Let’s Stop HIV Together is a CDC campaign that raises awareness about HIV and its impact on the lives of all Americans, and fights stigma by showing that individuals with HIV are real people -- mothers, fathers, friends, brothers, sisters, sons, daughters, partners, wives, husbands and co-workers.

More than a million people are living with HIV in the U.S., and the images and stories in this campaign are reminders that HIV does not discriminate across race, gender, or age.

More than three decades after the first reported AIDS cases, HIV is still an urgent public health issue in the United States. Approximately 50,000 Americans become newly infected each year and an estimated 1.1 million people are now living with HIV. Yet many do not know they are infected.

Combating stigma is critical to stemming the spread of HIV in the United States. The associated stigma can prevent people from getting tested, starting treatment, or disclosing their status to loved ones and potential partners. The CDC hopes this campaign will help diminish the stigma around HIV.


A Day with HIV exhibit will run through January 4, 2014, at the Atlanta-Fulton Public Library, One Margaret Mitchell Square, Atlanta GA 30303. To view more photos, visit http://www.adaywithhiv.com/ For more information, visit www.cdc.gov/ActAgainstAIDS/Together


Winnie McCroy is the Women on the EDGE Editor, HIV/Health Editor, and Assistant Entertainment Editor for EDGE Media Network, handling all women’s news, HIV health stories and theater reviews throughout the U.S. She has contributed to other publications, including The Village Voice, Gay City News, Chelsea Now and The Advocate, and lives in Brooklyn, New York, where she writes about local restaurants in her food blog, http://brooklyniscookin.blogspot.com/

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